About your Search

20131101
20131130
STATION
KPIX (CBS) 14
FBC 9
KQED (PBS) 9
CNBC 5
WJZ (CBS) 5
WTTG 4
CSPAN 2
CSPAN2 2
MSNBCW 2
WETA 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
MSNBC 1
WBFF (FOX) 1
WHUT (Howard University Television) 1
LANGUAGE
English 63
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)
] >> that's what i'm talking about! >> whoo! >> steve wynn is the man with the midas touch who added glamour to the gambling industry. >> if you're gonna start a gambling joint, start a gambling joint. >> he transformed las vegas into an international tourist spot, but the odds haven't changed. >> the only way to win in a casino... >> is to own one. >> own one. >> unless you're very lucky. [stopwatch ticking] >> internet gaming is illegal in the united states and absolutely thriving. >> yes! >> right now, as you watch this story, 70,000 people are gambling on party poker, and that's just one site. >> there will be more online poker games per day at the end of this year than all of the casinos in the entire world put together. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. by some estimates, gambling in this country is a nearly $100-billion industry. it attracts everyone from flamboyant businessmen to nefarious conmen. while the odds are heavily stacked against them, for millions of americans, gambling remains enormously popular, even in these hard economic times. in this episode, charlie
to work for them. >> yup. i was chief technology officer there. i worked very closely with bill and steve and others. and it will always have a part of my heart. and it's still an incredibly strong, strong company. it was some great internal values. but i think it's lost its way in a few dimensions. >> rose: well, you should know why. >> it's hard to know why. i think it's a better try say how. one is there's so many different agendas it's working on. >> rose: nathan myhrvold for the hour. next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: nathan myhrvold is here. he is the c.e.o. and co-founder of intellectual ventures. for many years he was the chief technology officer at microsoft. he was known as one of the most visionary technology and business leaders anywhere. he is also a culinary pioneer. his newest project is "modernist cuisine" in which he explores the science of cooking. he recently published his third book on the subject. it is called "the photography of modernist cuisine!" it's a visual window into his experime
fund firm started by billionaire steve cohen does not close the door on future criminal prosecution of individuals at that hedge fund. now, sac capital has released this statement saying in part: we take responsibility for the handful of men who pleaded guilty and whose conduct gave rise to sac's liability. quote, the tiny fraction of wrongdoers does not represent the 3,000 honest men and women wolf worked here -- who have worked here during the past 21 years. sac has never encouraged, promoted oral tolerated insider trading. no outside investors. our charlie gasparino has been following the case from the very beginning, he will be here in just a few moments, he's running back from the courthouse to tell us what it all means for founder steve cohen and his future managing money. and maybe even some of the other firms that might be now in the crosshairs. the stunning market rally continues right now. the scorecard, s&p 500 up some 24% year-over-year. right to the floor show. the cme group, the nymex and the new york stock exchange. first, we really should talk about what's going on w
accolades. steve ballmer is somehow more reviled than revered. one that with $300 billion in market capitalization has to be considered a success. and this is not just within the industry. this has become a pop culture thing now. on last night's episode of "south park," ballmer's assassination by an angry and disappointed bill gates was a major subplot. not only is steve ballmer viewed as a failure in his time at microsoft, he's sealed his deal where he says he recognizes that he's the person standing in the way of microsoft's progress. quote, maybe i'm an emblem of an old era and i have to move on. what was keeping microsoft from succeeding in this new world? quote, at the end of the day, we need to break a pattern. face it, i am a pattern. and so even he admitted it was time to go. was ballmer too hard on himself? not to execs i talked to at dream force. to them he is a befuddled fool who didn't see cloud, didn't see social, didn't see mobile coming. and he thought he could ignore it or somehow build it all into xbox one. what i would ask these executives offline, what is the bigg
of player misconduct. he has been accused excessively hazeing a fellow teammate, jonathan martin. steve harrigan joins from us miami. steve, there is more revelation that is might trouble people coming out about the suspended lineman. what do we know about this? >> certainly some more troublesome video coming out about richie incognito taken earlier this year with a group of teammates at a fort lauderdale bar called dirty blondes. images show incognito stomping around bare chested and using the "n" word in relation to another teammate who is present and appears to be laughing. more scrutiny of incognito's history as we, being kicked out of programs at university of nebraska and oregon and let go by the rams after fighting with the coach in 2009. i was voted dirtiest player in the nfl. he has been suspended indefinitely after discovery of racist text messages by the dolphins management. that management really wants to get to the bottom of things right now. owner steve ross called for an independent investigation by the nfl. the coach of the dolphins is on the hot seat but as far as the p
were once coins and bottle caps. ♪ ♪ >> i'm steve kroft. >> i'm lesley stahl. >> i'm bob simon. >> i'm lara logan. >> i'm charlie rose. >> i'm scott pelley. those stories tonight on "60 minutes." [ male announcer ] every inch. every minute. every second -- we chip away. making the colors of earth and sunset skies into rich interior accents. or putting the beauty of a forest in the palm of your hands... it will take you to another place... wherever you happen to be. this is the new 2014 jeep grand cherokee. it is the best of what we're made of. well-qualified lessees can lease the 2014 grand cherokee laredo 4x4 for $359 a month. you really love, what would you do?" ♪ [ woman ] i'd be a writer. [ man ] i'd be a baker. [ woman ] i wanna be a pie maker. [ man ] i wanna be a pilot. [ woman ] i'd be an architect. what if i told you someone could pay you and what if that person were you? ♪ when you think about it, isn't that what retirement should be, paying ourselves to do what we love? ♪ paying ourselves to do what we love? i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer match
recognition? . steve: for what purpose does the gentleman seek recognition? mr. mchenry: to address the house for one minute. steve: the gentleman is recognized. mr. mchenry: since the affordable care act was introduced president obama claimed time and time again, if you like your insurance can you keep it. over the last six weeks i have heard from numerous constituents across western north carolina that that was not what they were experiencing. unfortunately they had canceled policies because of oo obamacare. steve, pastor in hickory, received notice husband plan with a premium of $695 is being canceled. his new plan's premium, $1,500? marcia in claire month had her current plan cancel. the replacement was 1 3% more in cost. milton a retiree from denver had his policy canceled, the replacement, not only has high deductibles and co-pays, but also precludes him from seeing his curn doctor? i heard from terry a self-employed woman whose premiums were $359 a month until obamacare canceled these plans and her new premium is $759 a month. i ask my colleagues on the other side of the aisle to join
rose. >> tonight a special conversation with jony ive, apple's chief of design and the man steve jobs desribed as his spiritual partner. and marc newson, a industrial designer who made everything from ca, jewelry, and airport tin terrier, they teamed up to apple's red to auction the a sotheby's to go to the global find to find aides. ive and newson have known each other for 13 year, ive is almost as important to he'll success as legendary c.e.o. steve jobs. he is behind the designs for the i mac, ipod, i phones, and ios 7 the latest-- the it has helped apple sell millions of its products around the world. newson's range as a design is unparalleled, so much so that the "new york times" once asked, is there anything marc newson has not designedment his lockheed lounge chair has set world records at auctions. ive and newson have both redefined the boundaries between art and design, form and function. their work has been featured in museums and earned them countless awards. we talk with jony and marc about the auction, their craft, and their friendship. >> define for me what this exhibit
. up next, walter issacson who wrote about steve jobs and ben franklin. he's standing by in studio 57. we're talking at the man who met the man in black we're tal cold & flu season is back so before the first sneeze help protect with a spray before the first tissue help defend with a wipe. and help prevent with lysol to get 10x more protection with each hand wash and kill 99.9% of germs around the house. this season, go beyond cleaning to help protect your family with lysol. start healthing. >>> welcome back to "cbs this morning." coming up in this half hour author and long-time journalist walter isaacson is in our toyota green room. there he is. nick's still here. he must like it here squoo last night's election. is it a sign america wants our politicians to move closer to the center? >>> plus it's been ten years since the world lost johnny cash. the journalist who knew him for three decades. he shares his career and battle against demons. that's ahead. >>> this morning we want to show you this morn's deadlines. a woman defeated her husband in a general election. jennife
you are saying. >> and it wasn't steve rattner, we talked about this. it wasn't just this one ad. they went to ohio for a year and said mitt romney was a disgusting, filthy capitalist pig. it was on bain capital. they were clear. they told john heilemann, we have to destroy mitt romney. they went to ohio and they destroyed him as human being saying he was a horrible, filthy capitalist and yesterday, barack obama is going to massachusetts saying he's a role model. which is it? >> the other thing they did during the campaign is said mitt romney was responsible, attacking the health plan he put in place and accused him of being a hypocrite about that. i think the fact is, the massachusetts plan is a plan that worked. it is a model for our plan. we can talk about it later today. so, the president is latching himself on to that plan. i guess you are not happy he's doing that. >> no, he can. either mitt romney is a horrible human being or a role model for america, which is it? >> the health plan is a role model. >> there's really no answer. >> what is more embarrassing to you, how it r
the understand substitute. he wrote the best-selling biography of steve jobs and his su apple. welcome. >> great to see you. great to be with you. >> you spent decades. what do we read from these elections and how they may impact 2014? >> you know, there's a wonderful story about einstein. >> another subject of your biography. >> why not. he's watching in the early 1950s when america's going through mccarthyism and he writes his son and says i've seen this before. this country's going to go off of a cliff and then they write themselves. ize izeize hour eisenhower comes in. just when you think it's going to go off the a cliff it rights sits. this is what you're seeing now. >> terry mcauliffe said in his acceptance speech yesterday, remember when washington was broken? this is what happens when virginia bonds together and fixes itself. some thinks washington is still broken do. you? >> oh, yeah. they're badly broken and there's structural problems. there are a lot of things that make things bad. what's particularly different this time is back in this 1950s or even
that mean big premium strikes are coming for all? let's go in focus with steve forbes, rich karlgaard, morgan brennan, john tandy,. are they coming? >> young people think they're immortal. they won't sign up unless they
in success. jenna: steve moore, senior economics writer for "the wall street journal" and joins us now. steve what is your reaction to the president's comments? >> two words, jenna, revisionist history. i was covering this story back in 2009 and 2010 when the president was promoting obamacare. when he said in every meeting with the republicans whenever he did meet with the republicans look, i won the election, i get to write the health care bill. when you think about it, jenna, the kind of ideas that republicans wanted in any kind of health care reform were basically left on the cutting board table. things like tort reform which would save hundred of billions of dollars in the health care system. things like allow being people to buy insurance across state lines, something you and i talked about over the years. those kind of things were completely left out. republicans weren't idea lodge chill opposed to -- idealogically opposed to covering people with preexisting conditions. what they were idealogically opposed to was the massive tax increase to pay for this. jenna: pick up on what the gop i
shirt from express. $40. my skirt, same thing, express, 5 4ds. my choose from steve madden. >> i love a woman with a strong watch. michael cord. >> always. >> here's your diva fan. this is kimberly. we'll be right back. [ applause ] >>> i had some fun today. tomorrow we have another big show. my one-on-one interview with the former manager of tlc, perry pebbles reid will be here. plus, we'll have interesting dating tips. thank you for watching wendy. bye! [ applause ] surgeon. a pediatrician. these are pioneering advances in heart surgery. and these are developing groundbreaking treatments for cancer. th're the hands of the nation's top doctors. kaiser permanente doctors. and though they are all different, they work together on a single mission: saving lives. discover how we are advancing medicine at kp.org. join us, and thrive. mnever sleeping.g. ever saving. for him, her, and you. every day. but quality affordable health care seems forever out of reach -- until now. i'm doctor peter beilenson. with local doctors we've founded a new approach to health insurance -- evergreen health. n
earlier this morning. this morning, morning commute, steve moore boulevard has reopened. you can see traffic flowing just fine behind me. before we got to this point, officials were warning folks living around here if you see or smell smoke, best to stay inside. we found some who aren't listening to that. >> smoke covered the peninsula, even stretching into parts of the south bay. this two alarm sparked a little after one at metal management in redwood city. the smoke kept some from getting home. >> trying to get down the street to my boat. that's where i live. the fire is preventing anybody accessing it. >> reporter: the recycling center crushes cars, appliances, sends the metal monthly to china. sims one of the largest yards in the bay area. this isn't its first blaze. >> seems to be happening, like, once a year. the place goes up in smoke and flames. >> reporter: a few years ago, the epa found toxins like mercury and lady seeping from the yard into the bay. but this is not a water issue. the problem now is in the air. >> all smoke is harmful. you don't want to breathe any smoke.
adam and eve, not adam and steve. if the senate tomorrow makes the mistake of approving the employment nondiscrimination act proposed bit distinguished senator from massachusetts, it will pave the way for liberal judges to threaten the policies of countless american employers and in the long run put in question the legality of the defense of marriage act. >> this produced a particularly dark day for the gay rights movement. on september 10th, 1996, the senate passed the defense of marriage act overwhelmingly and then an hour later, it rejected enda 50-49. a week after that, bill clinton signed doma. that was 17 years ago. in some very big ways, the world changed a lot since then. states are now legalizing gay marriage. half of all americans now live in states where it is the law. the defense of marriage act is history, gays can now openly serve in the military. but for protection from job discrimination, there has been no progress there at the federal level. nearly every congress since 1994 has reintroduced enda. and watched it collect dust. this past week, it finally got a vote in the
learn the nfl may be conducting an investigation of its own. steve has the latest from miami. some more troubling revelations about the suspended lineman. what do we know? >> that's right. richie's case not helped, either, by the release of video from tmz which show him shirtless, stomping around the dirty blonde bar in fort lauderdale and shouting the n word in reference to a fellow teammate with him at the time. this has brought a lot of scrutiny to his past as well. he was released from the football program at nebraska and oregon and released from the rams after arguing with the coach. he has rage management as well as drug problems as well. next year he'll be a free agent. jon: what's been the reaction from the dolphins? >> from the very top, the owner, steve ross, has wanted a complete outside investigation. as far as the coach goes, he's really been on the defensive, being peppered by local hemedia. despite the outrage outside the stadium, inside the locker room the players are still expressing a lot of support for their embattled teammates. >> he had to get a guy to pick your bac
the fanatical attention to detail that the late steve jobs was known for. >> steve had a great sense of caring that he knew what went into the inside of an iphone or an ipad and that kind of thing is part of the legend of the collaboration between you and steve. >> i think it's just part of a much broader picture. so i think at the highest level it's to try and make something great. the only way you can do that is to care to an extraordinary level. and i think many things then testify to that. whether it's how you finish the inside of something, how it's assembled right way through to how you try to communicate its value having to package it. but i think certainly one of the things we feel strongly about at apple is you know that commitment to care and to try to make the very best product that we can. >> it is that per suit of perfection simplicity beauty and function that drives these two in everything they do. >> you just have to try to design great things that stand the test of time. certainly the antithesis of accessibility. if you can design really trul
kind of holiday? >>> inside the takedown of a mobster. steve kroft with new details about a "60 minutes" report on the 16 year search for james whitey bulger. >> i did ask him, aren't you relieved that you don't have to look over your shoulder anymore and it's come to an end? and he said are you [ bleep ] nuts. >> pope francis goes public with what may be the bones of the original pope. a mystery surrounding st. peter going back to 64 a.d.. >> plus the airline security measure that leads to costly decisions. >> i've literally seen people crying as their $300 or $400 bottle of alcohol is dumped in the disposal bin. >> the american company behind a high tech solution that could rewrite the rules. the new is back this morning. stay tune for your local news. >> this national weather report sponsored by kay jewelers. every kiss begins with kay. uh-huh. i know this hasn't always been easy for you. and i'm really happy that you're in my life too. ♪ it's just like yours, mom! [ jane ] behind every open heart is a story. tell yours with my open hearts collection at kay jewelers, the number one
time >> rose: he has also recently advised director steve mcqueen on his acclaimed film "12 years a slave." i'm pleased to have skip gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie, nice to be back. >> rose: where did this idea first come to you. because it's something you think would have been done before. >> in retrospect it really started when i was 17 years old, senior year of high school sitting in the living room of my parents in piedmont, west virginia, watching our little black-and-white t.v. and up jumps the first black documentary i ever saw. it was bill cosby's "black history, lost, ston or strayed." and it was one of those life changing events. i know wese that -- we overuse thaterm, it's a clay shea but it changed my life. i didn't know anything about black history up to this time. and a year ler when i went to yale the first course i enrolled in was the survey course in afterr american history taught by willm mcfeeley. >> rose: does every major university today have an african american studiesrogram? >> every one worth its salt. >> they all have some courses
ridiculous to me. >> i'm steve kroft. >> i'm lesley stahl. >> i'm morley safer. >> i'm lara logan. >> i'm anderson cooper. >> i'm scott pelley. those stories tonight on "60 minutes." i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. so, if you're sleeping in your contact lenses, what you wear to bed is your business. ask about the air optix® contacts so breathable they're approved for up to 30 nights of continuous wear. serious eye problems may occur. ask your doctor and visit airoptix.com for safety information and a free one-month trial. there's a lot i had to do... ... watch my diet. stay active. start insulin... today, i learned there's something i don't have to do anymore. my doctor said that with novolog® flexp
from perfume to children's toys, but which may also be causing birth defects. but first, steve kroft's story on the enormous amount of money being spent to treat people as they approach the end of their lives. how much money? well, in 2009, medicare paid $55 billion for doctor and hospital bills for patients as they approached the last two months of life. to give you some perspective, that's more than the budget for the department of homeland security or the department of education. and as we reported in 2009, most of those bills were paid for by the government with few or no questions asked and with an estimated 30% of the treatments having no meaningful impact. >> ms. klish, it's dr. byock. >> marcia klish is either being saved by medical technology or being prevented from dying a natural death. >> we're just here checking on you. >> she's been unconscious in the intensive care unit at dartmouth hitchcock medical center in lebanon, new hampshire, for the better part of a week. one of her doctors, ira byock, told us it costs up to $10,000 a day to maintain someone in the icu. >> thi
in focus with steve foes, rich karlgaard, morgan brennan, john tandy,. arthey coming? >> young people think they're immortal. they won't sign up unless they need it or have mental health
they are ready for the big leagues steve mcbride way they should have accepted a nice offer from the fox business we are a leading this is the work week cover things clean and fair and there was no reason to say no. whether they want to do another network but why some of the fox business id we would have done an excellent job but that being said there was a huge crowd and you could not get in there. says ceo and the executives in the middle surrounded by traders tuned obviously governors and the like then some of paparazzi and as a shield by the communications department. so unless i would do some crowd surfing at our rock concert it was near impossible to try to get to the center of the crowd or get comments. maybe we will make a better decision to wait for word but not all the at the open but what is most telling that holds onto the gains that we have seen so far. >> it is up 86%. later in the program we have qualcomm ceo paul jacobs "first on fox" business understanding we are a network that people listen to and i make the point because i guess we learned from the first business network to put
. adam: deal or no deal. steve cohen's sac capital is expected tuilty. there is still a chance that the deal could fall apart and sac could go to trial. here is how the dollar is moving today. [ male announcer ] what if a small company became big business overnight? ♪ like, really big... then expanded? ♪ or their new product tanked? ♪ or not? what if they embrace new technology instead? ♪ imagine a compans future with the fute of trading. coany profile. a research tool on thinkorswim. from td ameritrade. adam: oil is moving higher on civil unrest in libya where some of the worst fighting in months broke out in tripoli. want to look what oil is doing right now, as traders keep a close watch over a meeting between western countries and of course iran over its nuclear program. fox business contributor phil flynn from price futures group is in the trading pits of the cme. just how serious is the issue in libya? >> it is very serious. you can see that played out in the market, especially if you look at the spread between the brent crude what we trade in europe and wti crude.
. >> a scene from "12 years of slave." the scene tells of a true story. steve mcqueen directed the movie which is already considered an oscar favorite. good morning to you, mr. mcqueen. >> good morning. how are you? >> i'm good. if you win, you would be the first black director and first picture. do you wrap your brain around that or does oscar make you very nervous? >> no i wrap my brain around it. to have that kind of attention and response is something that, you know you're in a kitchen, you have an idea and all of a sudden the world is looking at you and you're surrender sudly thinking, oh my god. >> i heard people describe the film as brutally brutal. do you think it's a fair characterization? >> i think once you tell a story about slavery, you have to tell a story about slavery. there's no cutting corners. it's necessary. it's a huge part of the story. >> the story of solomon is an incredible story. your wife introduced you to his memoir? >> yes. >> are you thanking her every day? >> i thank her every time absolutely. what it was, i had the idea of a free man, a bla
him if he plans to bring new sangs to a vote in congress. steve kroft is in studio 57 with new details from his 60 minutes report, the tricks mobster whitey bulger used to hide for 16 years. and how the f.b.i. finally caught him. and this, a massive storm system is already forcing airlines to cancel flights. travel editor peter greenberg on what you can do if you're heading out of town. the news is back in the morning. see we'lbe watching. have a great day. >>> 6:32 now. the iran nuclear agreement signed sunday in geneva is a result of a year of secret talks between the united states and iran. some of the negotiations took place in a small middle eastern nation. the nuclear accord is designed to force acran to slow its -- iran to slow its enrichment of uranium. in exchange the united states is lifting some economic sanctions worth billions of dollars. secretary of state john kerry celebrated that signing of the iran nuclear accord and then quickly found himself having to defend the agreement. >> we will now be able to have greater inspection, greater knowledge, greater restraint and th
the differ between safe liquids and the ones that pose a real let.elal threat. >>> steve kroft went inside the nbi 16 year man hunt for whitey bulger. the srnlg he saidcertain ended in santa monica. >> they went by the aliases charlie and carol until the fbi got a tip. the agent set up a rose with their land lord and it ended one of the most embarrassing episodes in the bureau's history. >> reporter: he said he wouldn't knock on the door because there was a note posted stressly asking people not to bother them. carroll had told neighbors charlie was showing signs ofdy mention kra. so he devised a ruz involving the storage locker in the garage. >> had the name gasko. >> reporter: he had the manager call to tell them the locker had broken into and to come down to see if anything was missing. carol said her husband would be right down. >> guns out, fbi, don't move? >> gave the words, hey, fbi, get your hands up. hands went up right away. and then at that moment, we told him get down on his knees and he gave us -- yeah he gave us and i ain't getting down on my fing knees. d
was sitting down with steve jobs. he told me, listen, what you talk about is very important in health. have people focus on you, not what you wear. wear the same thing every time so they listen to the message. black and white pure vays the seriousness of health care. >> i never sat down -- >> how many black sweaters do you have? >> i have a bunch of them. >> that's what i thought. >> i'm going to buy you a red one just for grins. i think you'd look good. >> thank you, gayle. >> it wouldn't detract at all. >> no. >> good to see you. >> thank you, guys. >> aren't you glad we brought it snup. >> yes. you're making me blush. >> are you ever going to come back? >> dr. david agus. only on "cbs this morning," the last seek red of media typhoon william randolph hurst. go inside his sprawling private ranch never seen by the public until now right here on this show, "cbs this morning." >> announcer: cbs morning rounds sponsored by nick determine cq. derm cq.rm ten steps and you're free. the urge to smoke all day long. t help prevent your cravings with nicoderm cq. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] build
. >> if you knew someone was ripping someone off. >> my friend steve and knew these guys were getting inside information i believe -- >> you grew up in queens. are you telling me as you sit here that all these instances where he should have known -- you are a cop. >> i am telling you something right now. wherever he goes in the world he trades his own stock, sitting from 9:00 to 4:00, i can't talk to him, sitting in front of computers -- >> when you were a cop. >> he had these analysts and all that. >> you were a cop. when you were a cop and you saw place, you saw a possible illegal activity was going on, a lot of people getting busted you wouldn't, your sixth fence wouldn't say may be -- >> charlie -- >> it is a nice guy. >> all i see is a guy who is a smart businessman who looks at the evaluation of corporations, earnings and losses and all that. he sits in front of the computer -- >> i'm not saying he is a mobster but you busted mobsters. when you went after those guys, you saw criminal activity. >> how much criminal activity happens on 47st street with a guy not paying taxes? this is the
where people took a breath, that they cried, that they heard from people like steve davis whose death of his sister deborah was not even proven. that they hadn't no finding that he had done it. nevertheless you heard steve davis had to be propped up by his wife as he told whitey bulger that he hoped he, too, died like his sister, gasping for breath. >> the question has always been when will he take the stand. he didn't. the question is when will he appear at sentencing. he didn't. to make a statement. will whitey bulger ever speak out on this in any way. >> i think much to my dismay, charlie, as you know and to the dismay of others, i think that whitey bulger will not speak out. and one of the people we heard from yesterday was the son of roger wheeler who was legitimate businessman out of tulsa, oklahoma. and when his son got up to speak, as he held a picture, held it up of his father, and wanted to hear so much from whitey bulger because mr. wheeler told the fbi and the didn't of justice just as reresponsible for his father's death. whitey bulger refused to even look at these victim
! ] >> this is steve, he is the head of the upper extremity program for the hanger clinic and he will work with you right now. to help get you set up for what you need. >> like dr. travis said, we are here to help us on -- help out the good people. >> hold still. >> i know it. >> we are all done for today, we will get the process started. >> thank you so much, dr. travis! ♪ >> and charlie and carmelita, if you are watching, i want to let you know you have inspired me and reminded me how good people, good things happen to good people. these are two of the best people i have ever met in my entire life. i cannot wait to see pictures of you fishing and i am coming to that barbecue, okay? i am looking forward to it! you guys should come with me! >> we are there. >> charlie, stick around. if you are watching, here's what's coming up next! ♪ >> i don't mean to in any way suggest that you are not a good father, i think this is just a bad choice. >> announcer: coming tomorrow, all new on the doctors. >> i have been having unexplained funky body odor under my pits and my boobs and yeah, even down there.
. the center of the disaster is tacloban. a steve 220,000 people nearly flattened by the typhoon. and seth doane is in tacloban. >> reporter: at the heavily damaged edd tacloban airport thousands wait in the rain. as the c-130 cargo plane arrived on the tarmac. desperate survivors rushed to get on board. only a few hundred were lucky enough to get out. >> there's nothing here. >> reporter: this is what they're trying tos ing toing to escape. a city used to this. tsunami-like storm surges u.s. brigadier general paul kennedy saw it. >> we saw other small communities devastated. i'm talking nothing left standing. >> reporter: chapels have been into makeshift morgues. and survivors are picking through what remains of their homes, many collecting their belongings in a couple of bags. others already trying to rebuild. following reports of looting, philippine soldiers were deployed to restore some order, as residents wait for help. manila has become a bit of a staging ground for food and supplies. planes leave with aid. and return with just some of the 600,000 displaced reside
that has to do with benghazi for me? >> what's weird is when i talked to senate -- >> you're steve liesman, right? >> i'm steve liesman. they say the benghazi thing is more worrisome than the rand paul thing because the benghazi thing is more out there in the public domain and more likely to gain -- >> i don't think it was handled well. >> but the connection, even though the rand paul thing makes more sense to tie yellen to the fed audit thing, benghazi and the fed and yellen, i don't really see the connection. >> considering you said where do we draw the line, is $50 trillion too big? >> you mean on the fed's balance sheet? well, you asked what is the number? >> i did ask rhetorically what is the number. >> that's what i'm talking about. >> why talk to me? >> i don't know. >> i think the same of you. let's start off 7:00 in the morning with quite a few insults. >> you know what i mean, though. if we're going to talk about something, we thought we were priming the pump. we didn't know the economy ran on qe forever. >> we didn't. >> wipe don't we bring in our distinct guests. >> did you kno
gran bran doe, jimmy stewart, steve mcqueen. >> i'm nicholas cage and robert pattinson, james dean and rock hudson. >> i am norma shearer and lillian gish. >> i'm garbo. >> i'm like a sophisticated prop. i give you all the feeling you want, all the hair styles and wardrobe changes you want. i'm say whatever you put in front of me. >> do not expect me to take pride in what i do. >> i used to care about how i looked. now i don't care as much. maybe it's because i'm so handsome. >> rose: i am pleased to have james franco back at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> last time we saw each other was at brown university where you were attending rhode island school of design? >> that's great. that was a great interview. thank you. >> rose: so i just touch on this because you must get tired of talking about it. why so many things? or why not so many things? >> right. good question. um -- i admit i do a lot of things but they're all things i've been interested in as long as i've been interested in acting. basically they all -- you know, i guess -- they all fall under film, art, and literatu
huston, angela lansbury and steve martin. >> an oscar for best performance by a web site, it certainly wouldn't go to the one associated with the affordable care act. but is that a reason to discredit the healthcare law as a whole? paula pound stone has a letter for president obama. >> dear mr. president, i want you to know that i am still with you on this healthcare thing. access to healthcare.gov has been a miserably frustrating experience. >> the media would have us believe it has lost support which makes no sense, most of us agree that we loved the idea of people with preexisting health problems being able to receive coverage. it is simply not possible that technical challenges with the web site could cause voters to turn off on that idea. anybody who ever has used a computer knows that privilege goes hand in hand with frustration. why would we give up on the affordable healthcare law because of that? if we were ordering something from amazon, we would keep trying for months, heck if we were having cable installed we would take the day off work to wait for the cable man, we are n
ratings daily on over 4300 stocks. learn more at the street.com/nbr. >>> end of an era, steve balmer, microsoft ceo and chief sales meeting, bill gates gets emotional. what is next for the software maker and who will lead it? >> do it yourself. more people are and home depot is reaping rewards raising the outlook for the third time this year. it's not the only company profiting by the trends. >> pinched by
calls dangerous but steve croft in studio 57 with new detail from the 60 minutes report on the tricks mobster bolger used to hide for 60 years and this morning a massive storm system is already forcing airlines to in extra eflights, travel on what you can do if heading out of town. the news is being a in the morning, see you at 7:00. >> charlie, thank you. we will see you at 7:00. >> we sure will thanks charlie. >>> 6:51 here now. secret talks lead to big forward steps in relations between the u.s. and iran. the nuclear agreement signed over the weekend. details coming up. >>> a woman tries to jump to her death at a raiders game, but a fan saves her life. we've got a live report straight ahead. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, blamed for at least 8 death the west is moving across t u-s. it's alread >>> five things to know at the 55, the storm blamed for at least eight deaths in the west is moving across the u.s. , its already dumped more than a foot of snow in someplaces and forced airlines to cancel more than 300 flights at dallas fort worth international airport. the storm is expect today b
phone 4 in june of 2010? >> we're having a little problem here. >> steve jobs couldn't get it to connect to the internet. embarrassing, but they worked it out. when facebook went public last year a technical error in nasdaq's system delayed the start of trading resulting in a loss to market makers of half a billion dollars. and those of you old enough to know who rube goldberg was may recall the rollout of the edsel, a ford motor company automobile so awful its name still is synonymous with a costly flop. and let's not talk about lehman brothers, bear stearns, aig, jpmorgan chase. the crash of '08. beside those calamities, obamacare's computer problems pale. oh, yes, mistakes are made by big corporations and big government. and although i was for something else, something simpler and easier to manage, i'm betting this will get fixed. as for those strident partisan voices crowing over obama care's first bad round, ask yourself if those weren't some of the same voices cheering on the invasion of iraq and promising victory would be swift and easy. ten years. trillions of dollars. and all th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)